Wednesday, February 23, 2011

CARTOONS! And race...

Watch these cartoons!


Now, think about the ways that each race is portrayed in each cartoon. Do these cartoons rely on racial stereotypes to create a plotline, humor, or a point? Is this done in a way that is offensive or inoffensive? Why? What do you think about the cartoon's handing of race? Does it confirm ideas/stereotypes you already have of the mannerisms, behavior, or culture of certain races? I am not asking you if you think that either show is an ACCURATE portrayal of anything. I am asking you to look at HOW race is portrayed in each show. If King of the Hill was your only window into "whiteness" and The Boondocks was your only window into "blackness", what would you think of each of these two races? Post a well-written, well-constructed paragraph as a comment below. DUE FRIDAY BY NOON. Your paper assignment will be posted here TOMORROW BY NOON.

10 comments:

  1. After viewing both cartoons, I don’t think that King of the Hill rely on any racial stereotypes to create anything. Boondocks on the other hand rely on racial stereotypes to create a plotline, humor, and a point. It is offensive to both the rapper, and the old man that lives across the street. I feel it is offensive to the rapper because the people in the neighborhood did not want him there. He felt bad because they were his own people putting him down. Offensive to the old man, because the rapper mad a song named “You mad cause you to OLD”. The plotline on how a black rapper with money can basically live where he wants to. The humor of the show relays how blacks use Ebonics as slang when talking. Several points were made: When one of the neighbors went over and talked to the rapper he discovered that the rapper wasn’t as bad as he thought he was. The rapper showed the old man that he could live where he wanted to. When the old mans grandsons went to the rappers house they discovered that the rappers like the fact that one of the boys enjoyed reading. If King of the Hill was the only window into ‘whiteness” I would think that all white families do all they can to make there families happy. The white families try there best not to hurt the others feeling. On the other hand if Boondocks were the only window to “blackness” I would think that all rappers are loud, and party all the time. I would think that all rappers speak in slang, that they use excessive profanity, and that when black people are pushed on they push back (try to get even).

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  2. Watching these cartoons make you get a sense of humor, and really don't mind all the stereotypes and racism. I think King of the Hill doesn't really show racism or stereotypes in this episode. But, on the other hand, The Boondocks does. One reason I say that is because when the rapper moved to the neighborhood people began to say certain things and didn't want his company. King of the Hill is about family values and how they people should live. Also, when the people got to know the rapper, they began to think highly of him. The slang that he used was said to be wrong, but sometimes it's humorous. This is what I gathered from watching both of the episodes.

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  3. I believe that both cartoons rely on racial sterotypes. The boondocks more so than King of the Hill. In King of the Hill the family is poytrayed as a simple middle class family from Texas. The sterotypes used in the show are offensive, because if the Boondocks was my only window into "blackness" i'd be uninterested. The Boondocks showed blacks as a loud and beligerent race. At the same time it was so over the top(boondocks) that I couldnt do anything but laugh.

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  4. Both cartoons rely on racial stereotypes to create plotlines, humor, and points. I didn't find the cartoons to be offensive. The cartoons are satirical, so they are written in a manner to poke fun and create humor. As for behavior, culture, ideas, and stereotypes the cartoons portray a bit of reality as well as some really funny over the top entertainment. If King of the Hill was my only window into "whiteness", I would think that the white race were middle class and gun crazed with reasonable family values. If The Boondocks was my only window into "blackness", I'd think of the black race as being out of control and unpleasant.

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  5. King of the Hill doesn’t portray a plotline. Hank is just trying to let his son Bobby know that there is something that he is good at. The Boondocks on the other hand showed racism.The old man did not want the rapper to move into the neighborhood,because he was loud and enjoyed having a good time. It was offensive because the rapper should have be able to live where ever he wanted to.If King of the Hill was the only window into whiteness I would think that their families care about one another.If Boondocks was the only window into blackness I would think that black people would rather start confusion than try to work things out.

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  6. King of the Hill does a good job at portraying the Texas white man with the BBQ constantly and country accent. The Boondocks shows black relations to one another as well. They use the speech and slangs perfectly as well.

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  7. They bothrely on racial stereotypes to create plotlines humor and a piont.the boondock is really overly exaggerative at times am may be very offensive because black people truly don't live like that.This is not so in King of the Hills. They both confirm stereotypes that i have heard in the past and now but they were brought out more in the Boondocks.If the King of the Hill was my only window to whiteness i wouldnt think that bad of white people. Yes i will think that they maybe stuck up people but they are not too bad. On the other hand if the boondocks was my only window to blackness i would be afraid of black people, i will run from them basically.

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  8. Lilliona CaldwellApril 22, 2011 at 8:01 PM

    Both of these cartoons rely on racial stereotypes to create a plotline, humor, and a point . These cartoons are not offensive, they are satirical as to what the creator feels is a problem in America. They both confirm stereotypes of both races that I have seen or heard at some point in life. If "King of the Hill" was my only window into whiteness I'd say that all white people are trying to find a "sport" for their kid to be involved in. I'd think they'd be stuck up and drink a lot and make a lot of remarks regarding other people's races and cultures and such. If "The Boondocks" was my only window into "blackness" I'd say blacks were ignorant, rude, inconsiderate folk who also make racial remarks and should be more considerate of other folks. I'd say that they should learn to be more mannerable and respecting toward themselves, their property, others, and others' property as well.

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  9. The media portrays black people as being ignorant,gang bangers, uneducated, and violent.Huey contradicts these diffent sterotypes in this media. His character is not typically shown in pop culture. The Boondocks subevents the traditional sterotypes of black. Both cartoons rely on racial sterotypes to create a plotline, humor, and a point.

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  10. The Boondocks an King of the Hill rely on racial stereitypes to create humor.The both of these cartoons confirm stereotypes of both races. As for behavior, culture, ideas, and stereotypes the cartoons portray a bit of reality as well as some really funny over the top entertainment. If King of the Hill was the only window to whitness, I would think that all white hillbilies just stand around on the street, drinking and cursing each other out. An if The Boondocks was on my screen, I would think that all black rappers are loud an rude.

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